Inclusive Learning

We believe that everyone should be given the opportunity to achieve success through education. Our Supported Learning department welcomes students with a variety of moderate, severe, and profound learning difficulties and disabilities.

Our programmes are individually tailored and are taught in realistic working environments in a creative and imaginative way. By conducting effective and continuous assessments, we offer a personalised learning programme delivered in realistic settings.

Although lessons are delivered within the department, students are integrated into mainstream College life through shared facilities such as the College canteen, Student Union, gym and the Learning Centre. The College also has number of facilities used by Supported Learning, which include: IT suites, classrooms equipped with disability software, Opti-Music facilities, interactive whiteboards and accessible kitchens.

There are no formal entry requirements. However, a desire to improve independent living skills or progress into employment is required.

We are committed to providing education of the highest quality for everyone and believe that everybody has the potential to study, whatever their ability or background.

View our Local Offer

The Local Offer sets out all provisions relating to education, health and care that young people with learning difficulties and/or disabilities, their parents and carers can access in order to meet the needs stated in their Education, Health and Care Plan.

High Need Provision

High Needs provision is embedded within Inclusive Learning and across the college on mainstream programs. The college recognises its role in supporting learners with high support needs and is proactive in ensure that the appropriate support and resources are in place and applied in line with Education, Health and Care plans.

What is High Need?
A learner with high needs is defined as a young person aged 16 to 18 who requires additional support costing over £6,000 and any young person aged 19 to 24 subject to a learning difficulty assessment or, in future, an education, health and care plan, who requires additional support costing over £6,000.

Part 3 of the Children and Families Act 2014 explains the current arrangements for young people with learning difficulties and/or disabilities. The Act aims to encourage education, health and social care services to work together. Local authorities must describe the provision available to young people in the area by publicising the ‘local offer’. A young person has a learning difficulty or disability if he or she has:
• a significantly greater difficulty in learning than most others of the same age
• a disability that prevents or hinders him or her from using facilities of a kind generally provided for others of the same age in mainstream post-16 institutions

Next steps

Possible options for progression to employment include:

Hospitality and Catering Horticulture
Office Administration IT
Retail Performing Arts