Login Work at WLC Hire Our Venues Click to open mobile menu with site search
Our History

Our History

1820

Ealing College opened as Church House Boys’ School at the corner of Church Lane and St. Mary’s Road.

1879

On 23 April 1879, the Science and Art Department (School of Wood carving) officially opened, founded by Colonel John Donnelly, R. Poynter EDIS, J. H. Donaldson and H. J. Wood.

Italian artist Signor Anton Leone Bulletti was one of the first people to be employed to teach at the school.

In August, the school transferred to a room at the Royal Albert Hall and reopened in November. In December, they admitted women for the first time.

1880

Church House school moved to new premises in the Mall at the corner of Hamilton Road, and opened in 1880 as Ealing College, leaving Church House to be demolished in 1882.

1881

Brook Green School of Art was founded in 1881 at Brook Green by Francis Hawke, with the establishment of a few evening classes to prepare students for science and art certificates. It was later renamed to Hammrsmith College of Art and Building.

1885

Hammersmith College of Art and Building moved into premises at the junction of Dunsany and Haarlem Roads (later known as Brook Green Studios and now converted into flats).

1889

Acton and Chiswick Polytechnic opens to meet the needs of local industry, offering technical education. Classes were held in Acton at the Priory Schools.

1899

Evening Commercial School, later known as the Fulham Commercial Institute, opens on Sherbrooke Road.

1901

Ealing College moves to the Hall, Ealing Green.

1904

Hammersmith College of Art and Building is passed into the hands of council, who start to construct a new building in Lime Grove.

1908

Hammersmith School of Arts opens its doors with a renewed, extended curriculum. Classes were linked to either industrial or craft professions.

1911

Acton Commercial College is taken over by John Mackay.

1913

Ealing College classes moved to Ealing County School for Boys.

1914

A trade school for girls is erected on the same site as the Hammersmith School of Arts. Subjects taught include Upholstering, Laundry, Cookery, Dressmaking and Tailoring, Millinery, and Art.

1922

Fulham Commercial Institute becomes the Junior Commercial Evening Institute and now offers courses in 6 locations. The buildings they occupied were utilised as schools for younger children during the day, and institutes for teenage students in the evenings.

1922

Hammersmith Day Continuation College opens in Brook Green to provide day-release courses in general, commercial and technical education for younger students already at work but whose employers allow them time during their working week for further education or vocational training at college.

1924

Junior Commercial Evening Institute offers courses in two more branches, one being at South Park.

1925

Acton Commercial College is moved to the Mall, Ealing, as Ealing College. Grove House is sold to Acton U.D.C. who go on to build a new college.

1928

Acton Technical College was built in 1928 on the site of Grove House, High Street, by the county council, as the first of seven colleges to expand further education in Middlesex.

Southall Technical College opens.

1929

At Hammersmith School of Arts, a side extension to the original building in Lime Grove is started.

1930

The new extension is opened at the Hammersmith School of Arts & Crafts. It includes a library, science labs, common room, gym and state of the art building crafts facilities.

1932

In November Southall Technical College, comprising an Evening Institute, a Junior Technical School and Technical Day classes, is recognised as a college of Further Education. An expansion of the premises starts.

1935

Hammersmith School of Arts & Crafts puts on the first exhibition of its student’s work.

1937

In March, the School of Wood-Carving, South Kensington is transferred to the Hammersmith School of Arts and Crafts building in Lime Grove.

1937

Southall Technical College starts to organise courses for employees of the Fairey Aviation Company. Subjects taught include aircraft design, aerodynamics and the theory of the internal combustion engines.

1937

Ealing College becomes known as Ealing Technical Institute and School of Art.

1939

Acton Technical College acquires the former county school in Woodlands Avenue.

1946

By the beginning of the first World War, commercial classes had developed rapidly while Science and Art classes had reduced.

Two adjacent Commercial Institutes, Fulham and Hammersmith, joined to form the West London College of Commerce.

1953

Hammersmith Day College for Further Education in Brook Green is associated with the Shepherd’s Bush Junior Commercial and Technical College. It has 3 branches in the borough of Hammersmith at this time.

1956

Hammersmith Day College merges with two Evening Colleges in Fulham.

1956

Acton Technical College moves all advanced teaching to its new buildings in Woodlands Avenue (Mill Hill Road) near the former county school, creating two separate institutions.

1957

West London College of Commerce appoints a new principal –  Dr Bonnney Rust. It has headquarters on Earsby Street, Hammersmith Road W14, with sites in Holland Park, Childerley Street and Bishop’s Park School.

1961

Ealing Technical Institute and School of Art renames to Ealing Technical College.

1962

Hammersmith Day College is divided into a General and Technical Department (Brook Green) and a Commerce Department (day and evening) in Macbeth Street. It still also has its two evening branches in North Hammersmith and Fulham.

On completing a course at Hammersmith Day College, students are advised to join a senior course at West London College of Commerce.

1963

The variety of courses at West London College of Commerce had grown so rapidly that the college was renamed West London College with campuses at West Kensington, Holland Park, South Park and South Kensington.

1964

Hammersmith Day College renames to Hammersmith College for Further Education.

1965

Acton is joined into the borough of Ealing, reorganising all schools and colleges in the area.

1967

Thomas Huxley College opens as Acton College of Education, to prepare mature students for teaching, housed in the town hall.

1972

Plans for a large building to house Hammersmith College for Further Education and West London College are announced

1973

A site is acquired for the proposed new joint college building, with an estimated cost of £6million. The separate identities of the colleges will be preserved, although students will benefit from shared facilities, such as the common room, main entrance hall, lecture theatres and dining accommodation. Hammersmith College of Art & Building will also have classes in the building.

The main service areas are designed to act as a noise baffle, where the site borders Talgarth Road, while a concrete roof structure will reduce aircraft noise from the Heathrow flight path above. 

1975

The art department of Hammersmith College of Art & Building leaves to join Chelsea College of Art and Design.

1975

In January, Hammersmith & West London College is formed by the merger of Hammersmith College for Further Education,
Hammersmith College of Art & Building and West London College.

1977

Ealing Technical College becomes Ealing College of Higher Education.

1980

Acton College of Education closes, after plans to merge it with Ealing Technical College are unsuccessful.

1980

In January, the new building for Hammersmith and West London College is completed in Barons Court at a cost of nearly £7million. All other campuses that were part of the estate are merged into the new site by August, with the exception of Lime Grove, which is retained as a school of building.

The college rents a block at the former Mary Boon School, called the Avonmore room, to teach catering.

1992

Southall College of Technology, Norwood Hall and Ealing Green High School merge to form Ealing Tertiary College.

2002

In January, Ealing, Hammersmith and West London College is formed by the merger of Ealing Tertiary College and Hammersmith & West London College.

Three colleges were part of the Ealing Tertiary College estate – Ealing Green College, Acton College (Mill Hill Road) and Southall Community College (Beaconsfield Road).

On 29 July, a large fire takes place at Ealing Green College that destroys many valuable historical documents. The fire is a result of an accident at nearby flats, which were being converted into offices.

2005

Ealing Green College is expanded with an £11.5million specialist centre, housing TV and media facilities.

2015

Acton College on Mill Hill Road is closed, sold to the Department for Education.

2016

The college partners with Ealing Council to refurbish Southall Manor House at a cost of £1.5million.

2017

Ealing, Hammersmith and West London College acquires the name West London College from Heriot-Watt University, who had previously used the name for their arts, design and fashion specialist independent school in Mayfair and Marylebone.

Later that year, West London College wins the Times Educational Supplement FE Award for Outstanding Use of Technology for Teaching, Learning and Assessment.

2018

West London College leases a building in Park Royal industrial estate, to house a temporary specialist construction centre, which opens for students in September.

2023

Part of Southall Community College is refurbished to house a state-of-the-art construction and green skills centre, allowing the college to vacate its temporary Park Royal site.

COURSE SEARCH
HAMMERSMITH & FULHAM
COLLEGE
HAMMERSMITH & FULHAM COLLEGE
HAMMERSMITH & FULHAM COLLEGE
Gliddon Road
Barons Court
London W14 9BL
020 7565 1200
EALING GREEN COLLEGE
EALING GREEN COLLEGE
EALING GREEN COLLEGE
The Green
Ealing
London W5 5EW
020 7565 1200
SOUTHALL COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
SOUTHALL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
SOUTHALL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Beaconsfield Road
Southall
London UB1 1DP
020 7565 1200
British Council
Cambridge English
Disability Confident Committed
English UK - Member
Education & Skills Funding Agency
EU European Social Fund
FIS - Associate Member
Google for Education - Reference College
IELTS - English for International Opportunity
Trinity College London - Secure English Language Tests
Matrix - Quality standard for information advice and guidance services
The National Skills Academy - Rail
OET - Premium Preperation Provider
QAA - UK Quality Assured